Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archives by Tag 'results'
Tracey Richardson

Tracey Richardson: If you develop people results will follow!

By Tracey Richardson, - Last updated: Saturday, June 1, 2013
So how "lean" is a lean start-up? What an intriguing; yet, difficult question to answer- there are so many tangents of this in my opinion. For me I suppose it has a lot to do with how you or your organization defines Lean itself. It's amazing when I ask this question across various industry's the answers I get that are so far away from the true essence of Lean, no wonder its only a short-term "project" for many- start up or not. I think this within itself drives the thinking of an organization and how ...

Continue reading this entry »

Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: Metrics create a focus for the company so changes lead to meaningful business results

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Monday, January 28, 2013
I agree for the most part with the observations of my colleagues.  Summary:  "You get what you measure" translates into "Let's measure what we think we want and we will get it."  There are two problems.    First, we often cannot measure what we want.  We want engagement, we want people to pay close attention to quality and safety, we want engagement, we want people to produce more in less time, we want people to product just what the customer wants, etc.  Each of the measures is a proxy for what we really want.  With many measures and pressure people work ...

Continue reading this entry »

Dan Markovitz: A lean leader achieves objectives by developing workers’ capabilities to deliver those results

By , - Last updated: Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Leaders are lauded for delivering results. Wall Street in particular prizes predictability above all. But reaching goals or benchmarks doesn’t speak to the sustainability of the accomplishment. “Chainsaw” Al Dunlop fired people at Sunbeam (and other companies he “led”) left and right on his way towards reaching profit targets. Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling of Enron cooked the books to hit its numbers. In neither case were the results sustainable. By contrast, a lean leader builds the capacity of the people and the system, so that the results — and the ability to continue to deliver results —  transcends the leader’s ...

Continue reading this entry »

Jan van Ginkel: What distinguishes a Lean leader from a very good, Traditional Leader, in behaviour and results, in one, clear statement?

By , - Last updated: Saturday, March 3, 2012
What distinguishes a Lean leader from a very good, Traditional Leader, in behaviour and results, in one, clear statement?
Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Assess along purpose (results), process (means), people (learning) framework of a lean management system

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Sunday, January 22, 2012
Lean adds new perspectives to the traditional ways of assessing executive performance, namely Results and People skills, and adds a third process or value stream dimension. These mirror the purpose (results), process (means), people (learning) framework of a lean management system. The lean logic behind this is that you need knowledgeable people running tightly integrated end-to-end value streams and projects to deliver results that will be sustained. In other words, good people running a good process generate good results. This also provides the right basis for redesigning these products, value streams and business models as circumstances change. A lean assessment starts ...

Continue reading this entry »

Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Real lean results will show up in bottom-line and cash

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Wednesday, January 19, 2011
If I'm honest, I have to admit this is not an issue I've encountered firsthand. I hear many people complain about the fact that their lean program does not deliver budget-level efforts, but I have to wonder what kind of lean we're talking about. Withe the CEOs and Operations VPs I work with, lean delivers in terms of bottom-line and cash in the one to two year horizon. or put it more precisely, the companies I work with show percentage points improvement in bottom-line and significant cash gains in between one to two years time. Since the effort is personally driven ...

Continue reading this entry »

Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: Lean opens new avenues for business results, but it sometimes hard to know in advance what those benefits will be

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Wednesday, January 19, 2011
First, I want to reinforce Orry's points that there are short-term gains and long-term gains.  The most obvious short-term gains that many companies will accept are labor reductions and then only if you send these people out the door on layoff.  That is self defeating and will kill the incredible potential for operational excellence to change the business strategy.  In reality, even in companies that reduce labor significantly in percent terms it usually happens in scattered areas of the company so for the bottom line it does not have a big impact on total cost of the company.  Unless you ...

Continue reading this entry »

Art Smalley

Art Smalley: Focus On Delivering Results

By Art Smalley, - Last updated: Saturday, June 5, 2010
I think Tom Ehrenfeld asks an interesting question for us to consider. In its shorter form "How do you convince others to be lean?" I'll go out on a limb and say that you don't. Or more specifically at least that I don't bother trying to. Leaders have to decide for themselves what to do and how to go about doing it to a large extent. Otherwise they are not real leaders in my opinion. Sure they might need some assistance but I have never seen a very successful company of any type that did not have excellent leadership. So ...

Continue reading this entry »

Tom Johnson: Financial results such as revenue, cost, and profit are by-products of well-run human-focused processes

By , - Last updated: Thursday, February 18, 2010
Dear “Lean Edge” Colleagues: The cause of Toyota’s current crisis is found, in my opinion, in its very recent surrender to Wall Street pressure to grow continuously, as virtually all large publicly-traded American businesses, including those that pursue “lean” practices, have attempted to do for the past 30 years or more.  Steady growth in size and scale presumably improves profitability by conferring increased control over market prices and decreased costs. Unfortunately, as Toyota has discovered, the strategy never works. The flaw in this finance-oriented growth strategy is the belief that profitability improves by taking steps aimed at increasing revenue and cutting costs.  ...

Continue reading this entry »

Theme by Matteo Turchetto|Andreas Viklund