Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archives by Tag 'practice'
Mike Rother

Mike Rother: Next Generation Lean Practice

By Mike Rother, - Last updated: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Question:  How do you make time for improvements? 
I find it difficult to ask my people to make time for improvement work when they’re already completely busy doing their regular work. You may be making too much of a distinction between regular work and improvement. That might have sufficed in the 20th Century, when efficiency and cookie-cuttering the mass model seemed to be two universal business goals. A “Generation” is approximately the period of time between the birth of parents and the birth of their children. The original Lean movement in the West began in the 20th Century about a generation ago, ...

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We learn to practice lean and take personal responsibility for solving problems by using the scientific method time and time again. What else does it take to learn how to cooperate across departments and functions?

By , - Last updated: Tuesday, September 24, 2013
We learn to practice lean and take personal responsibility for solving problems by using the scientific method time and time again. What else does it take to learn how to cooperate across departments and functions?
Steve Bell

Steve Bell: Leading your team in the practice of collaboration and experimentation

By Steve Bell, - Last updated: Saturday, September 7, 2013
Not only can you contribute, but you and your teams should play a significant role. Over the past several years I’ve seen an interesting trend emerge. It wasn’t all that long ago when the enterprise avoided involving IT in a Lean transformation. Often, Lean practitioners viewed IT as an impediment to continuous improvement. And sometimes they were right – historically IT has often been unnecessarily complex, costly, risky, unreliable, and resistant to change. Fast forward a few years. CIO’s, seeing the gains realized by their operations colleagues, began applying the principles of Lean (through such disciplines as Agile, Scrum, and ITIL) ...

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Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Ringi is a tool to learn to define target conditions and practice meaningful hansei

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Saturday, December 29, 2012
There is always a temptation to see TPS tools as operational tools rather than learning tools. Ringi as an operational tool is nothing more than a corporate way to deploy hoshin kanri. So what? On the other hand, ringi as a learning tool is essential to both defining target conditions and practicing hansei – big topics! I had not thought much about ringi for a while. I first came across the term, what – twenty years ago (it’s scary when you start counting in decades!) as we were all discovering Toyota practices and trying to sort out the Japanese from the ...

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Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Lean is a CEO practice to improve performance

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Wednesday, November 23, 2011
The first thing his sensei told my father when they started working together was that the great weakness of TPS was that it rested entirely on the plant managers. Years later, this statement turns out to be confirmed, time and time again. If there’s one thing we’ve learned is that lean is a practice – and well, a practice. I’ve been discussing this issue with other CEOs and one different way at looking at lean is that it is a personal practice for the CEO to have a direct influence on his or her company’s performance. This practice is based on, ...

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Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Waste Elimination Is The Ultimate Development Practice

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Monday, January 10, 2011
Most companies would argue that they’re intent on developing their people, and to do so they invest a substantial part of the budgets in training of all sorts, from technical skills to managerial practices. Mostly, this training is conceived on the university model: an expert specifies the best known way to do something, trainees learn it as well they can and then are tasked to apply it. Because of obvious organizational constraints, training is separated into classroom training with a trainer, and then, hopefully practical application left to the participants. In such training conception, the trainees manager is not particularly ...

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