Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archives by Tag 'Performance'
Art Smalley

Art Smalley: Lean Conformance vs. TPS Performance

By Art Smalley, - Last updated: Tuesday, January 7, 2014
The main question asked here is "have workplaces moved to multi-purpose cells or do we still see isolated operators on the shop floor (現場 / Genba)"? The statement implies that was what “Toyota” was teaching us 20 years ago.  Well that last part I sort of doubt it. In reality that is partly what the observer was learning or partly what the instructor was relating at the time. Unfortunately that is not the right frame for implementing TPS with success. I will probably not answer the question in the way the person posing this might have expected so apologies up ...

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Art Smalley

Art Smalley: Performance Organizations

By Art Smalley, - Last updated: Wednesday, April 11, 2012
This month's questions asks why is there such a resistance to creating learning organizations and why are leaders letting the future deteriorate without doing anything about it. I am not sure that I can answer the question with any relevant facts to be honest. In order to answer this question properly I think the proper thing to do in TPS spirit is to "get the facts" and proceed from that basis. In this case for example we'd have to survey an adequate number of executives and measure their responses. Some might have no resistance to creating a "learning organization" while ...

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Art Smalley

Art Smalley: Evaluating Executive Performance

By Art Smalley, - Last updated: Tuesday, January 24, 2012
 Let’s consider answering this question in reverse for some contrast in terms of discussion. In other words what is the wrong way to evaluate executive performance? For starters as has been mentioned I don’t think you can just focus on results especially financial ones although of course they are very important. Many factors outside of direct executive control affect financial performance. Often a rising tide lifts all boats and simply being in the right place at the right time can make a company successful for a few years. Decisions made years ago by predecessors or colleagues in other departments might ...

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Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Evaluate efforts to improve performance indicators and develop self-competencies

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Saturday, December 17, 2011
What an interesting question! And difficult to answer, as every organization has its own traditions and practices on the topic. If we’re talking evaluation and not incentive, the one thing I’ve learned the hard way in lean transformations is that you can’t simply focus on results because you’ll tend to give the hardest projects to some of your best guys. If a hospital evaluates its obstetricians on complications at childbirth, it will unwittingly punish the top specialist that gets all the hard cases. Results on key indicators are nonetheless important. What we tend to do first is to separate financials from ...

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Eric Buehrens: What is the right lean way to evaluate executive performance?

By , - Last updated: Friday, December 16, 2011
What is the right lean way to evaluate executive performance?
Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Lean is a CEO practice to improve performance

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Wednesday, November 23, 2011
The first thing his sensei told my father when they started working together was that the great weakness of TPS was that it rested entirely on the plant managers. Years later, this statement turns out to be confirmed, time and time again. If there’s one thing we’ve learned is that lean is a practice – and well, a practice. I’ve been discussing this issue with other CEOs and one different way at looking at lean is that it is a personal practice for the CEO to have a direct influence on his or her company’s performance. This practice is based on, ...

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Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: there is no end point to lean success, only transformation leading to increased performance

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Friday, May 27, 2011
Great question!  We thought we might sneak in over the fence unnoticed with that one.  The reality is an Industry Week survey like that one, that purportedly measures achievement of results, is purely subjective and depends highly on what the "anticipated results" are as the question suggests.  It tells us little about the actual success of the lean programs.  We were using it as it was one easy to understand factoid that shows companies are struggling with their lean programs because of the way they view them and approach them so it was convenient.  Let us assume that they are ...

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The Lean Edge

The Lean Edge: Can the performance achieved by applying lean thinking be sustained over years?

By The Lean Edge, - Last updated: Saturday, April 2, 2011
Can the performance achieved by applying lean thinking be sustained over years? Toyota seems to have been able to maintain a culture of relentless kaizen since the 1960s and over several Presidents' change, but has any other company? How can lean results be sustained over time? Has any company done it?
Steven Spear

Steve Spear: High Performance through High Velocity Discovery

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Monday, January 25, 2010
Dear Peter, Thanks so much for your question. A few points, elaborated on below. A: Success goes to those who improve and innovate most quickly and consistently. B: The ability to do so is rooted in core capabilities/disciplines that allow relentless discovery. C: Many managers are trained to think in terms of decisions, not discovery, thereby imperiling their ability to learn and improve continuously. A: High Performance through High Velocity Discovery In most sectors, even those with the most intense rivalry, there are standouts who achieve superlative performance by their ability to generate and then sustain improvement and innovation unmatched by breadth and speed. B: Disciplines of Discovery ...

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Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Goals and means to achieve superior performance

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Monday, January 11, 2010
Goals and means have to go together. Either one without the other does not lead to lasting improvements. To do this managers need to work together to dig down to the underlying root causes of the often vaguely defined performance gaps facing the organisation. Understanding these root causes helps everyone to focus on closing the vital few gaps that will make the biggest difference to the organisation, its customers and its employees. At which point someone can be given the responsibility for gaining agreement across the organisation using the evidence based, scientific method to implement and test the right countermeasures ...

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