Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on 9 mai 2015
Archives by Tag 'perfection'
Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: Lean provides the “hows” to the pursuit of perfection

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: dimanche, septembre 11, 2011
In our recent book, The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement, we start the book by talking about the pursuit of excellence.  We came to the realization that talking about "leaning out processes" gives a mistaken image.  It is a mechanistic view of the world that gives the impression that lean is like going through a field with a weed whacker and cutting down the weeds.  Actually that is a good analogy because if you do this to your weeds they will simply grow back, and if you go around with tools and "lean out processes" entropy will set in and ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: Relentless pursuit of perfection means just that – self-critique and facing one’s problems

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: mercredi, février 16, 2011
Toyota has long committed itself to the "relentless pursuit of perfection" by cultivating and sustaining relentless, internally generated improvement and innovation.  The results were legendary: movement from terribly unproductive in the late 1950s to on par by the early 1960s, a productivity leader by the late 1960s and a quality leader too by the early 1970s.  Subsequently, it set an unmatchable pace of introducing affordable, reliable new models, brands like Lexus and Scion, and innovative product technology like the hybrid drive, all the while increasing its organizational scale, scope, and complexity with aggressive efforts to localize its production (and later ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: Perfection is achieved by discovery

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: mardi, janvier 18, 2011
The challenge common to all organizations is achieving exceptional performance to gain and sustain competitive advantage.  Achieving superlative results in terms of quality, productivity, reliability and responsiveness demands that improvement and innovation--both small scale and large--be as regular a part of work and delivering product and service to market. A capacity for relentless betterment is a prerequisite for success because nothing designed by people--product, service, or the processes behind them--is designed perfectly.  At best, the initial design is adequate.  Perfection is only achieved if an organization is capable of discovering towards it relentlessly. Therefore, the only way an organization can compete by ...

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Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker:continually assessing what customers want, striving for perfection in satisfying customers and in every aspect of our production and service process, developing in people the ability and motivation to detect and solve deviations from perfect one-piece flow, leaders who are developing in people the ability to continuous improve, and a long-term value of the enterprise on satisfying customers and contributing to society.

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: lundi, novembre 22, 2010
As you know Wikipedia is a kind of public free-for-all in how different topics get defined and analyzed and this person got there and took the time to write something so I give them credit. In a book I and coauthors just completed that will be out in the winter, entitled:  The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement, we argue that we may have misled the public through definitions of lean that focus on waste reduction.  If I may use a quote from that book: "At the risk of sounding disrespectful, what do all these people think they are doing by leaning ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: commitment to safety is unwavering, but perfection hits bumps in the road

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: lundi, mars 15, 2010
Thanks for the question. With all due respect to Professor Schein, there are other alternative explanations to "abandon safety" or "safety never part of their culture."  It is entirely possible (more likely) that safety--both workplace and product--remains part of their culture but maintaining perfection hit bumps in the road. These bumps in the road are: 1: The need to develop an increasing number of great problem solvers at an accelerating rate because of business expansion. 2: The need to develop people's problems solving skills to greater depth because of increasing product and process complexity. 3: The difficulty of responding to the weak signals of problems ...

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