Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on 9 mai 2015
Archives by Tag 'means'
Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: Visual control means displayed information is acted on

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: dimanche, octobre 19, 2014
Often we talk about the difference between visual displays and visual control.  Visual displays mean information is shown, while visual control means information is acted on.   One type of visual is the metric board where we represent the actual versus target, another is the andon which physically warns us of an out of standard condition, while a third type is a physical indicator of the state of the operation versus standard such as a kanban square.  In all these cases we are seeing the actual versus the standard and as Jon says we need a system of response to contain the ...

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Samuel Obara

Sammy Obara: Sensei means professor

By Samuel Obara, - Last updated: samedi, mai 3, 2014
I am not sure what is just semantics when we differentiate a consultant from a sensei. Is consultant a title and sensei a role? Is that a matter of posture? In Japanese, sensei means simply professor. I strongly believe that a sensei can be a consultant and perhaps vice versa. In fact, some of my Toyota senseis became consultants after they retired. Now, how good a consultant were they? Some Toyota senseis who were very respected in Toyota and even had direct learning from Mr. Ohno, became very poor consultants according to their clients ("according to their clients" is the key piece of information ...

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Pascal Dennis

Pascal Dennis: Nemawashi literally means “going around the roots” — so as to prepare a tree for transplanting.

By Pascal Dennis, - Last updated: vendredi, août 17, 2012
Here are my thoughts. Nemawashi literally means "going around the roots" -- so as to prepare a tree for transplanting. The word evokes images of quiet, patient work: · Finding a the right spot for the tree, both physically and aesthetically, · Ensuring good sun, soil & drainage, · Digging new hole of the right depth & diameter, and then watering and fertilizing · Carefully transplanting the tree, filling in the hole, etc Thereby, we develop a 'shared understanding' -- another rich image. Lobbying, by contrast, implies hectoring, cajoling, and perhaps bribing. (In America, lobbyists vie with lawyers and politician's for the title of Most Despised Profession.) In summary, nemawashi ...

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Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Assess along purpose (results), process (means), people (learning) framework of a lean management system

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: dimanche, janvier 22, 2012
Lean adds new perspectives to the traditional ways of assessing executive performance, namely Results and People skills, and adds a third process or value stream dimension. These mirror the purpose (results), process (means), people (learning) framework of a lean management system. The lean logic behind this is that you need knowledgeable people running tightly integrated end-to-end value streams and projects to deliver results that will be sustained. In other words, good people running a good process generate good results. This also provides the right basis for redesigning these products, value streams and business models as circumstances change. A lean assessment starts ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: Relentless pursuit of perfection means just that – self-critique and facing one’s problems

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: mercredi, février 16, 2011
Toyota has long committed itself to the "relentless pursuit of perfection" by cultivating and sustaining relentless, internally generated improvement and innovation.  The results were legendary: movement from terribly unproductive in the late 1950s to on par by the early 1960s, a productivity leader by the late 1960s and a quality leader too by the early 1970s.  Subsequently, it set an unmatchable pace of introducing affordable, reliable new models, brands like Lexus and Scion, and innovative product technology like the hybrid drive, all the while increasing its organizational scale, scope, and complexity with aggressive efforts to localize its production (and later ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: Excellence is the common goal. Discovery, be it called improvement, innovation, or invention, is the means

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: lundi, novembre 22, 2010
Arguing the merits of lean versus six sigma versus agile versus any other quality method creates a distraction of debating labels and the artifacts associated with each rather than understanding the fundamentals that allow some organizations to achieve levels of performance unmatchable by others. The truth is there are very few organizations that have achieved exceptional levels of performance based on a capacity to continuously improve and internally generate innovations broadly, consistently, and with tremendous speed and velocity. That handful certainly includes Toyota, which converted itself from a second or even third rate automaker in the late 1950s into an exceptional ...

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Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Optimising end-to-end flows rather than keeping separately managed assets busy means overturning many of the assumptions on which today’s MRP and ERP systems are built

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: jeudi, septembre 23, 2010
There are many ways to answer this question. IT systems reflect three things. First the way management thinks about setting priorities, controlling operations, problem solving etc. Second the way at least the bigger systems are sold – like construction, you bid low and promise novel features to get the contract and then make money on the changes, so they are over budget and late. Third, the belief that the only way to control complex systems is to model and simulate them in order to control every action and make sure every asset is fully utilized from the centre. Lean thinkers approach ...

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Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Goals and means to achieve superior performance

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: lundi, janvier 11, 2010
Goals and means have to go together. Either one without the other does not lead to lasting improvements. To do this managers need to work together to dig down to the underlying root causes of the often vaguely defined performance gaps facing the organisation. Understanding these root causes helps everyone to focus on closing the vital few gaps that will make the biggest difference to the organisation, its customers and its employees. At which point someone can be given the responsibility for gaining agreement across the organisation using the evidence based, scientific method to implement and test the right countermeasures ...

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