Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archives by Tag 'Managing'
Jeff Liker

Dan Jones: Managing Horizontally as well as Vertically

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Silos are a symptom of a deeper problem in organisations. Getting rid of silos is not the answer to this problem. Traditional management systems organise expert knowledge into vertical functions and departments and use these to allocate resources across the organisation. So does Toyota. However following Toyota’s example, lean organisations also manage the flows of the work (or value streams) that create the value customers are paying for. This is in fact the primary purpose of any organisation, and profits are the result of doing so efficiently and effectively. These value streams usually flow horizontally across many departments and even across ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: Managing work to see problems when and where they occur

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Wednesday, June 23, 2010
Managing work to see problems when and where they occur is a necessary precondition--one too often overlooked--if an organization is going to achieve bona fide continuous improvement in pursuit of operational excellence. Here's why. Absent an ability to design perfect systems for design, production, and delivery on the first try, operational excellence depends on continuous improvement and relentless innovation.  As important as it is to have rigor in solving problems, the necessary pre condition is managing work so problems—flaws in the current design of systems and the current approaches to doing work--are seen when and where they occur. Deming, for example, was a passionate advocate of the 'Shewhart Cycle' of Plan, Do, Check, ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: The objective function in managing any system must be solving problems and learning

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Friday, March 12, 2010
The objective function in managing any system must be solving problems and learning.  There are four principles of a 'basic science' of system design, operation, and management, which if followed, generate, sustain, and accelerate high velocity learning, improvement, and innovation. If they are not followed, learning, improvement, and innovation are compromised. (This basic science has a sound theoretical underpinning as it is rooted in the science of closed loop control and experiential and experimental learning.) Learning, improvement, and innovation are core objective functions because the complexity of the 'socio-technical' systems (e.g., groups of people, doing interdependent work, to create value for others) upon which we depend for delivering value to customers. The complexity ...

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Michael Balle

Michael Ballé: Lean is about better managing costs, not cutting costs

By Michael Balle, co-author of The Gold Mine and The Lean Manager - Last updated: Monday, December 7, 2009
The fundamental insight is that in any cost structure there is a kernel of costs which are common to all competitors in terms of materials, components, labor, equipment, overhead etc. and then around these costs, an additional layer of costs which are due to the firm's operational method - waste, in the lean sense (costs you incur unnecessarily because of things we don't know how to do, poor planning decisions and wasteful activities this generates). "Lean" is lean in the sense that it tries to progressively take the unnecessary costs out of the system. Lean usually approaches cost management with ...

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