Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archives by Tag 'ideal'
Jeff Liker

Jeff Liker: TPS experts within Toyota will always want to drive in the direction of the ideal of one-piece flow

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Monday, January 6, 2014
Experts within Toyota on TPS will always want to drive in the direction of the ideal of one-piece flow. They believe in this quite passionately. In a Toyota assembly plant this looks like a super long continuous flow line. The plastics plant look like a process island of molding machines though there is a clear flow of raw materials to finished bumpers that are built in sequence to the assembly line. The body shop is mostly flow lines as is paint. The stamping plant is another set of process lines to build up a major ...

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Jeff Liker

True North: Find the gap to the ideal state to stretch yourself

By Jeff Liker, - Last updated: Sunday, October 9, 2011
"True North" is used quite a bit around Toyota, though the hard-core TPS folks do not like it preferring "ideal state."  Either concept has a similar meaning which is that you should understand the gap between the ideal and the actual so you can see how far you need to go.  Toyota Business Practices, which replaced practical problem solving, has an explicit step to define the ideal state.  Then the gap between the ideal and the actual is broken down to manageable steps and an explicit target for the kaizen activity.  Then root cause analysis proceeds for the gap relative ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: The True North “Ideal”: A source of tension for continuous improvement

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Wednesday, September 21, 2011
In Toyota thinking, there are at least two indicators that a problem is occurring that needs to be resolved. -- The first is a sign that the process is not in control and that the process is understood imperfectly. -- The second, the 'True North Ideal,' as we called it in "Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System," is a source of relentless tension for improvement and innovation--even when the system is capable and in control. 1- Specification, Built in Tests, and Problems as sign of gap between expectations and actual experience. "Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System <http://hbr.org/1999/09/decoding-the-dna-of-the-toyota-production-system/ar/1> " begins ...

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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: The gap with the ideal is a good place to define objectives

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Thursday, October 21, 2010
There are at least four conditions that trigger improvement: what we did didn't work as planned, we disappointed a customer, there is an anticipated (or actual) need to get better, and what we do departs from the ideal. The most superlative operationally excellent organizations generate and sustain rates of improvement and innovation that are faster, broader in span, and more relentless than their peers and competitors can generate. There are several triggers for this improvement. First, because work is consistently designed so departures from expected approach or outcome are immediately evident, those surprises are trigger for problem solving. Second, even if work proceeds as ...

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Sandrine Olivencia

Tom Ehrenfeld: Can you teach the lean ideal of respecting people without actually bullying them?

By Sandrine Olivencia, - Last updated: Wednesday, December 23, 2009
From a distance, lean looks like such a nice, humanistic improvement approach—one that treats people with respect and generates knowledge from the ground up. That’s all well and good, but the practice of teaching, and doing, lean invariably involves conflict, frustration, and, to be honest, what seems like a fair amount of bullying from superiors to prod their employees to “get it.” Isn’t the reality of doing lean far more frustrating and conflicted than one would think? How do you get people on board in a meaningful way? How do you teach the gospel of respecting people without bullying them ...

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