Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
Archive for February, 2015
Mark Graban

Mark Graban: The focus should be on improvement, in a balanced set of measures, not just a single number

By Mark Graban, - Last updated: Thursday, February 26, 2015
Percent value-added is an interesting thing to measure in a process or a value stream, but we have to be careful putting too much emphasis on that metric. Let's say I am managing an optometrist clinic where the average appointment length is 60 minutes. There are three value adding steps: 1) the assistant doing an initial exam, 2) a machine that does an eye check, and 3) the optometrist exam. Those three steps take a total of 15 minutes, so the % VA time is 25%. The waits in between the three process steps are where a Lean thinker would look ...

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Jean Cunningham

Jean Cunningham: More than before and less than it will be in the future

By Jean Cunningham, - Last updated: Tuesday, February 10, 2015
Percentage of value add for a process should be more than before and less than it will be in the future. Continuously improving toward the customer need. Constantly creating an environment where all people in the process are thinking and experimenting on ways to improve. Celebrating the improvements you have made and anticipating improvements to come. Ensuring the use of the trilogy of business management tools: Strategic Deployment, cross functional process improvement, and managing for daily improvement.
Karen Martin

Karen Martin: Begin where you’re at, seek 50% gains with every improvement, and never stop

By Karen Martin, - Last updated: Tuesday, February 10, 2015
It truly does depend on the setting, industry, etc. In manufacturing production, there's no reason to not get well above 50%. In offices, 40% starts being respectable unless the org has implemented cross-functional work cells, technology solutions, sustainable pull systems, work segmentation, etc. (Most pre-improvement office value streams hover in the 5-10% range.) In many patient care settings, you can get above 50% fairly easily. Bottom line: Begin where you're at, seek 50% gains with every improvement, and never stop.
Tracey Richardson

Tracey Richardson: A good goal to start with is a 70% value add process

By Tracey Richardson, - Last updated: Monday, February 9, 2015
In the past several months I have had this question come up actually in different industries. So how should one determine or "calculate" value add percentage within a process (micro)? This can be subjective depending upon what you are measuring and how, but I know, based on my Japanese sensei's, you can weave through a process and determine its value add and non value add content/percentages if you are conditioned to see it and categorize it. In manufacturing type work, by nature, can be easier to "see". In M & I flow (for example) the ...

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The Lean Edge

The Lean Edge: What should be the target value-add percentage in a process?

By The Lean Edge, - Last updated: Monday, February 9, 2015
What should be the target value-add percentage in a process?
Jon Miller

Jon Miller: Value-added Percentage, and other Parlor Tricks

By Jon Miller, - Last updated: Monday, February 9, 2015
"What should be the target value-add percentage in a process?" This is a very interesting question. Oddly, value is one of the least discussed and understood topics in lean. Perhaps this is because there is so much good that can be done simply by tackling the vast amounts of obvious waste in most of our organizations and processes. Even a poor definition of value is good enough, as long as it sheds light on the opportunities to covert wasted time and effort into more valuable ones. Value is subjective. Humans define value. How we define value is time-bound. Humans are very bad ...

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