Lean Frontiers: Are they differences in getting middle management on board from getting executive management support?
Are there differences in getting middle management from executive management on board for 1) developing the lean enterprise and 2) direct engagement on their part? What are the differences, if any?
Posted on May 9, 2015
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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Warm heart, cool mind

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Thursday, November 13, 2014
The previous posts have clearly given a good framework around which to establish a basic set of competencies. I would like to add that any person moving into a ‘facilitating’ role needs to exhibit what I call a ‘warm heart, cool mind’ behavioural pattern. The reasoning for this is simply that the overriding mission/purpose for anyone in a Kaizen Promotion Office is to develop people (as opposed to showing off their technical proficiency at problem solving). And to develop people you need a warm heart to establish the rapport so that learning and transfer of skills can take place. Technical ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Visual is the key – 70% of our sense receptors are dedicated to vision

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Monday, October 20, 2014
To me it is less a question about whether it is 'visual management' or 'visual control' but more about the 'visual' component. Dealing with the semantics of management versus control, if pushed, I would liken the 'control' to a closure of the feedback loop of an activity whereas the 'management' component a broader description of the tools used and more importantly what one does with them (Jon, Jeff and Samuel have given great explanations of this aspect). I really do believe that Steven's response requires more airtime - coming from the engineering world I am constantly amazed at the triumph of commercial expediency reverse engineering itself into supposed 1st ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Set the expectation every one must train others

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Monday, August 4, 2014
Other than having a good look at the practice of recruitment and succession planning criteria it is assumed that this person is already in the position. Clearly incompetence is not going to benefit the business or, in the longer term, the incumbent so the short answer is clear - remove. But before this process is establish it might be an idea to go back to basics and have a look at these measures (I know they are as old as the hills but still very relevant): 1. Can't do 2. Can do under supervision 3. Can do on own 4. Can train others It would be useful to set as a ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Use standards as a rallying point, not in a punitive sense!

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Friday, March 22, 2013
Before considering the question directly it might be useful to understand that it only applies to the uptown white bread world of organisations that actually have standards, however misguided/informed the underlying thinking that created them may have been. There is, in the real world, a huge heaving mass of the economic sector that has very little comprehension of the benefit that ‘standards’ can bring to the organisation (this issue of establishing standards is perhaps the subject of another debate on The Lean Edge). I don’t feel that there is a simple Yes/No ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Straight Delivery Rate (SDR) basically measures how much of your product went through your process(es) within the design leadtimes and quality parameters

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Monday, January 28, 2013
The adage that you get what you measure (and then some other bonus unexpected behavioural outcomes) is as true as ever. This has been lucidly described in this forum and in the literature. However, the central point still remains, and that is to achieve a specified result it is critical for one to understand the underlying processes. I recently listened to an interview with one of the South African Test cricket team members talking about how they became the world's best test cricket team (cricket, to my European and American colleagues is the game played with a flat bat and a hard red ball ...). What he said, ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: KPO or Production Control function?

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Sunday, January 6, 2013
The wording of the question takes as a given that a KPO should be formed and focusses on the practical aspects of creating and maintaining a KPO. The obvious linkage between OMCD in Toyota and a "KPO" is seductive to use as a template for other organisations. But one needs to be aware of the scale issue - Toyota's OMCD is a small group (around 25 people) that is Head Office based to serve the entire group globally. To the best of my knowledge there isn't an "OMCD" at each of its manufacturing facilities. ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Establish a daily pattern production schedule to sequence your presses

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Saturday, October 6, 2012
There is a huge difference between the typical “assembly” line production and the manufacturing environment. We are all guilty, to some extent or another, of trying to replicate the ‘sequential production’ paradigm into a world that experiences ‘non-sequential’ work loadings – a world of high product variability, short runs and shared resources. Herewith some ideas for you to consider. 1.       Close the feedback loop by linking your output requirements (i.e. your customer) with your input. Use the available forecasts to determine your plant loadings and establish a daily pattern production schedule. Use your existing layout as the basis for your planning – ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: Is nemawashi checking the relevance of a solution and enriching it with key field actors, or simply promoting / enforcing it ? It is both – and which one is applied is dependent on your intent.

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Monday, August 27, 2012
Nemawashi is a double edged sword.  Both edges work equally well. Which edge to use is entirely dependent on the intent of the person initiating the engagement. I first came across the practice of nemawashi during new model launches. Especially during the (then) traditional sit down meetings to review project progress. Before we started to discuss and agree on the way forward, there was a tendency to every now and then “Shanghai” someone publicly. This, of course, leads to a spiral of retribution … and if that weren’t so debilitating on relationships and more importantly on getting the job done, it ...

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Peter Handlinger

Peter Handlinger: To fully and deeply commit to the PDCA cycle, all day, every day

By Peter Handlinger, - Last updated: Sunday, March 25, 2012
If you had to force a one liner statement from me in answer to the above question I guess it would have to be “To fully and deeply commit to the PDCA cycle, all day, every day”. But what does this mean practically in terms of behaviour and results? Some very clear guidelines have been offered in the previous sections. Also, many references to Toyota have been made and, having spent 14 odd years in Toyota, I can recognize many of the behaviours described. Of course, whilst at Toyota we did not understand the meaning of Lean – but were schooled ...

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