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Steven Spear

Steve Spear: In high velocity learning, standardization is about capturing the best known approach in design, and seeing flaws in production

By Steven Spear, - Last updated: Monday, April 15, 2013 - Save & Share - Leave a comment

To your quote:

In France, the battle against lean is raging (as in: CEOs use lean for brutal productivity gains and Unions are dead set against it),
Ironically, both adversaries in this contest share a common assumption: that standardization, visual management, and the like are for the purpose of control–management wants to exercise it, labor wants to avoid it.
Also shared is the assumption that work is low variance but numbingly routine or non routine but high variance in quality and productivity.
That, of course, misses the reality by which Toyota another superlative organizations succeed.
All work is designed with best intent, but that intent does not compensate for the reality that all work is exceedingly complex, and hence all work is flawed in the shortest terms but improvable–by large margins in everything but.
Therefore, in organizations oriented around high velocity learning, standardization serves two positive roles:
-1- capture in design what is in the moment best known approaches, and
-2- create the opportunity in operation to see flaws when and where the occur, before the have opportunity to hurt someone or something.
This is wholly indifferent to production or design, manufacturing or services.
The question I have, why do the French you describe (and so many others) have such an impression of “lean” that is so diametrically opposed to what has made Toyota successful?
Maybe that can be our next question.

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